Discuss the risks in terms of likelihood and impact. Again, to do this find sources for support. In other words, if doing a construction project in Houston in August, and you indicate the risk of a hurricane then what is the likelihood of a hurricane hitting the Houston area in that month?

I’m working on a management project and need a sample draft to help me study.

 

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Project has been done but need corrections please. section 2 and 3 needs to be worked first I will include what I have plus the instructions

Part 1 – Building Your Project Plan

undefinedYou and your project team must develop a new project (product or service oriented) for your organization.

undefinedExamples of past projects include:

undefined

  • building a new house;
  • wiring all the equipment in the College of Business;
  • demolishing existing space and then building the 40,000 windows café in the UHD library;
  • building a platform in the Gulf;
  • customizing an existing space for a) clothing store, b) restaurant, c) bar, d) neighborhood recreational facility, e) pet boarding facility, etc;
  • organizing and putting on a) sports tournament, b) live concert, c)wedding, d) company gala, etc.;
  • building a backyard patio, pool, kitchen, etc.
  • designing & producing garments and conducting a fashion show
  • tearing out and rebuilding of patient areas and lab space in a local hospital

undefinedThe above represents only a partial list. The best topic for your team is one for which you have contacts! The keys are that it interests you and you have some confidence in your team’s ability to find information on the project requirements and costs, specifically direct labor costs by which your budget will be generated. You will need the types of resources (people) required for each task as well as task durations. Overall, the project should have 150+ tasks and have an anticipated duration of three months. Choose carefully, because although your professor will guide you in the initial brainstorming sessions, the decision is up to the team.

undefinedYou and your team will complete the following items regarding your project, including a background analysis and project narrative, a project overview, a discussion of project objectives, and description of your general approach, and a discussion of project constraints. For now, use these elements to focus on a big-picture analysis of your intended project. Details can wait until later.

undefined

Company Background

undefinedTell the story (who, what, when, where, how) of the company or organization for which this project is being done.

undefined

  • Who founded this company? Who are its leaders?
  • What does this company make or do? What is its target market? What is its financial performance?
  • When was the company founded? Where was/is it located?
  • How does the company operate? How effective is the company in its industry? How are its competitors placed in the market?

undefinedIf using a company website, be sure to cite the source!

undefined

Current Process

undefinedWhat is the current process or existing scenario for accomplishing the company’s goals? In other words, how does the company conduct business? If, for example, it is a construction business building new homes, what would be the process that encompasses the company’s procedure from advertising through getting customers, doing the project and closing out the project deliverable. This current process might be something like:

undefined

  • Receive customer specifications
  • Design preliminary floor plan and elevation
  • Send preliminary documents to customer
  • Receive and execute customer changes
  • Create bid for customer contract
  • Run bid through technical and legal departments
  • Ship bid to customer
  • Follow up with customer
  • Negotiate details of bid acceptance
  • Build the negotiated architectural design
  • Oversee construction budget
  • Deliver agreed upon product to customer
  • Receive payment
  • Close out project using lessons learned approach

undefinedYour project must fit within the framework of the company’s business. In other words, if the company builds single family residences, your project would not be for an office building. It must be related to a specific type of single family home/townhouse.

undefined

Project Overview

undefinedThe project overview is a report on the project undertaking and a discussion of the general situation management finds itself in. This provides important context for the project management team to use in determining methods, approaches, and timeframes, as well as a scope.

undefinedFor example, if building a new home, you should state whether it will have one or two stories, three or four bedrooms, and any other rooms that are to be included. There may be important details regarding the lot, area of town, and other issues such as landscaping. Be as detailed as possible, since this will assist the instructor in understanding and ultimately approving your project based on his/her belief that you have a viable project topic for a team of 3-4 persons.

undefined

OBJECTIVES

undefinedObjectives describe concrete outcomes that a project will meet so as to be deemed a success. Goals need to be described as specifically as necessary-but no more specifically than that. The purpose is not to artificially constrain the project but to limit the project to as wide a range of acceptable outcomes as possible. Targets are measurements of how well the goals were met. For example:

undefined

Goals Targets
1) Provide construction blueprints to customer Excellent = < 4 days

Good =< 1 week

Acceptable = < 2 weeks

2) Decrease delivery time on all raw materials from 10 days Excellent = -40%

Good =-30%

Acceptable = -15%

3) Reduce amount of rework from inspections Excellent = -80%

Good = -65%

Acceptable = -50%

5) Decrease cost overruns Excellent = -40%

Good =-30%

Acceptable = -15%

undefined

GENERAL APPROACH

undefinedWhat will be the general project approach taken, in terms of managerial and technical changes, to create these changes through the project? For example:

undefinedManagerial approach – These items relate to how the managers will plan, organize, direct and control the project resources toward the targeted outcome.

undefinedTechnical approach – These items relate to the procedural aspects needed, including logistics of moving equipment to and from the site, designing the blueprints to meet customer expectations, utilizing computers, etc.

undefined

CONSTRAINTS

undefinedDescribe the things that will limit the project. For example:

undefined

  • Budget constraints—This project will increase profitability by perhaps 30%, but therefore should not cost in excess of three times this savings to ensure that its payback period is relatively short.
  • Time—This project must be completed in the time agreed upon by builder and customer in the contract terms (proposed to be 90 days’ time).
  • Customer contracts—The project must not impact operations for current customers nor fail to meet the customer demands for this project.
  • Regulatory standards—Rework and shutdowns caused by inspections that are not up to code will delay and potentially kill the project.

undefined

Part 2 – Developing the Work Breakdown Structure

undefinedDevelop a work breakdown structure (WBS) for your project based on the first project assignment. The process is as follows:

undefined

  • Create a detailed list of the components of the project, through work packages, tasks, and subtasks. Use the intended scope of the project to help you determine all the project components.
  • Determine the resource needs for the project (i.e., personnel, facilities, and equipment).
  • Determine the relationships between the project components and the people. For example, for each component, at least one person will be responsible for its completion, while others may be involved as consultants or decision approvers.

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Example Work Breakdown Structure

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ABBREVIATED PERSONNEL TABLE

undefined

Name Department Title
Joe Evans Accounting Bid Manager
Sim Elezar Projects Project Manager
Kim Astair Engineering Systems Architect
Leo Biel Operations Operations Manager
Tara Simmons Operations Logistics Manager

undefinedNOTE: If you do not have names, you can identify the personnel by job such as Master Plumber, Journeyman Electrician #3, etc.

undefined

ABBREVIATED SAMPLE WORK BREAKDOWN STRUCTURE

undefined

WBS
1 Improvement Project Main Project
1.1 Deliverable 1: Bid response time Deliverable 1
1.1.1 Map current bid process Work Package
1.1.1.1 Interview bid team Task
1.1.1.2 List bid steps and process relationships Task
1.1.2 Conduct value-added process study Work Package
1.1.2.1 Determine value added by each process step Task
1.1.2.2 Separate process steps into necessary vs. unnecessary Task
1.1.3 Reform process to eliminate unnecessary and non-value-added steps Work Package
1.1.3.1 Pare down to only necessary and value-added steps Task
1.1.3.2 Identify ways to improve and shorten remaining steps Task
1.1.3.3 Create new process map Task
1.2 Deliverable 2: Increase customer response rate Deliverable 2
1.2.1 Interview customers Work Package
1.2.1.1 Create survey Task
1.2.1.2 Find non-responsive and responsive customers Task
1.2.1.3 Deliver survey Task
1.2.2 Analyze removing response rate barriers Work Package
1.2.2.1 List primary reasons for low response Task
1.2.2.2 Order reasons for priority/feasibility Task
1.2.3 Implement new measures Work Package
1.3 Deliverable 3: Reduce bid complaints and calls Deliverable 3
1.3.1 Interview customers Work Package
1.3.1.1 Create survey Task
1.3.1.2 Find unhappy customers Task
1.3.1.3 Deliver survey Task
1.3.2 Analyze resolving complaint root causes Work Package
1.3.2.1 List primary reasons for bid complaints Task
1.3.2.2 Order reasons for priority/feasibility Task
1.3.3 Implement new measures Work Package
1.4 Deliverable 4: Decrease bid package size and complexity Deliverable 4
1.4.1 Interview customers Work Package
1.4.1.1 Create survey Task
1.4.1.2 Identify customers with bid size complaints Task
1.4.1.3 Deliver survey Task
1.4.2 Determine appropriate bid content Work Package
1.4.3 Implement new bid construction process Work Package
1.5 Deliverable 5: Increase customer contract sign rate Deliverable 5
1.5.1 Identify existing market bids Work Package
1.5.1.1 Benchmark market leaders Task
1.5.1.2 Analyze price ranges Task
1.5.1.3 Analyze bid features Task
1.5.2 Normalize bid features and ranges to market expectations Work Package
1.5.2.1 Identify target market Task
1.5.2.2 Match bid creation process to intended market Task

undefinedNOTE: Instead of the diagram above, you can simply copy and paste your Microsoft project view obtained by inputting all tasks, indenting as necessary, and inserting the column WBS for the coding/numbering. The WBS does NOT include any dates, predecessors or durations. These are aspects of scheduling while the WBS is simply a breakdown of all aspects of the project deliverables.

undefinedExample Responsibility Matrix

undefinedThe example above can be modified using letters and/or numbers instead of the symbols give. You must, however, explain what it means to be responsible, to support, etc. Also, given the extensive nature of your real-world project, your list of work packages (WP) and the personnel involved will be much more detailed. Instead of the names of people, you may use your resource job description, such as master plumber, journeyman electrician, etc. Again, you can copy from your Microsoft Project’s Gantt chart/input view at the work package/tasks level. Do not assign resources to the sub-deliverables (those in bold lettering).

undefined

Part 3 – Project Risk Assessment

undefinedYou must analyze all risks that could prevent completion of your project. To do this:

undefined

  • Generate a list of likely risk factors. Use sources to support that these could be possible risks. Do not simply make up things you believe to be risks without investigating reliable sources. Internet websites are fine for your research. Be sure to copy these and cite them in your analysis.
  • Discuss the risks in terms of likelihood and impact. Again, to do this find sources for support. In other words, if doing a construction project in Houston in August, and you indicate the risk of a hurricane then what is the likelihood of a hurricane hitting the Houston area in that month?
  • Develop strategies for handling (or accepting) these risks.

undefinedThe above risk analyses will require the following two matrices with explanations..

undefinedFirst: Risk Assessment matrix requires the research identified in item 1) above. When you determine a number on the scale of 1 to 5 for likelihood, impact and detection difficulty, you should refer to a designated scale that you determined. For example, 1 might mean 20% or less, 2 might be 21-40%; 3 might be 41-60%, etc. or 1 might be defined qualitatively as Very Unlikely; 2 as Unlikely; 3 as Somewhat likely, etc. Whatever scale you use should reflect the research that you conducted.You may not be able to find as much on Impact and Detection Difficulty in the literature but, again, define your scale to define your terms and number scores.

undefined

Risk Likelihood Impact Detection Difficulty When
Major injury requiring immediate medical attention 3 (state here the % of major injuries in construction) 3 (may indicate a short work crew for duration) 1 (easily observed that worker is severely bleeding or in shock) During the project
Hurricane hitting the Gulf Coast 1 (this will depend upon your project’s start and end dates, I’ve assumed we are working in November) 5 (must shut down and evacuate the site including all equipment and loose objects) 3 (weather reports can be followed but often off as to exact location hit) During the exterior deliverable

undefinedSecond: Contingency Matrix clearly indicating the risk and action taken. Be very clear in identifying your Trigger. The trigger is that which causes you to put an action into place. The trigger for a hurricane would be different depending upon the close proximity of the storm. If the hurricane is 2 days out, you could mitigate damage by actions to secure the site. If the hurricane suddenly changed course and you are now in danger of a direct hit, you may have to accept the risk and get people off site quickly. If it is possible, you could avoid the hurricane damage by not building in the Gulf Coast area in August. So, the trigger involves when you see this risk happening.

undefined

Risk Response Trigger (what is observed) Contingency Plan Who responsible
Major injury requiring immediate medical attention Transfer Worker has cut hand badly and is bleeding profusely from wrist Contact ambulance service to take him to hospital Site supervisor
Hurricane hitting the Gulf Coast Mitigate Weather report indicates your site is in direct path of storm due in 48 hours Batten down the site; move equipment and personnel to safe location Project manager

undefinedOverall, be very clear in your analysis throughout these two matrices and graph. Be sure you research and explain with Works Cited evident!

undefined

Part 4 – Developing the Project Schedule

undefined

Before you start your input, you need to specify the holidays/non-working days in your project. You must also specify the working times for the project. Default is Monday-Friday from 8-12 and 1-5. In construction, for example, this may not make sense. You can set different working days for a specific resource once that resource is entered in Part 5. You can also, set different working times for any resource or group of resources once they are entered. For this section, state your working times and add predecessors and durations for each activity (not sub-deliverables!) in your WBS from Part 2. Everything is not “1 day”! And if something is one day, be sure to remove the default “?” from that duration entry. You can change your project start date using Project tab and you can change the default from days. If something takes only a couple of hours, then type in “2 hrs” and MS Project will convert this into fractions of a day (if that “days” is your project default).

undefinedThe scheduling output includes the Gantt Chart view clearly showing durations, times and beginning/ending dates with the Gantt chart, the network diagram (or Tracking Gantt), and a statement of the critical path. Remember that if you group by critical, you get a list of the critical activities but these may be on multiple paths. You MUST check your network and/or tracking Gantt to identify the critical path(s)! Also, a critical path is a statement of the activities, not the line numbers or an alphabetic identifier.

undefined

Part 5 – Managing Your Project’s Resources

undefinedNow, that you have a schedule and ideal project duration, you must add your resources to each activity.(See Part 6 below for Resource Sheet view).Overallocated resources will be identified in the Gantt chart view as well as in other views; again see Part 6 below. You must resolve any overallocations. Your resource-leveling procedure should be consistent to utilizing your resources identified. The key to this is maximizing the use of project resources while minimally disrupting your project schedule from Part 4.It may be necessary to use several iterations. Thus, you must consider first that the project is time constrained and level within slack. Identify any resources now no longer overallocated.

undefinedIf you cannot resolve all overallocations, then level outside of slack, assuming that your project is resource constrained. Identify changes made.

undefinedLastly, if neither approach works, rethink your resource usage by Maximum Units and/or allocations to activities.

undefinedYour project section should identify what you did and why. It must show your revised schedule including your new Gantt chart view, etc. In particular, there is a Report of Who Does What When that will show your resources as not being overallocated (Task and Resource Views do this as well).

undefined

Part 6 – Developing the Cost Estimates and Budget

undefinedFor your project we are concerned only with labor costs in support of your project narrative and scope statement. Your budget will roll up from the labor costs entered into the Resource Sheet.If a person is salaried, you need to compute the hourly cost for this resource. If you have a flat bid rate, you can enter this as Cost/Use but it will be easier to level this resource if again, you calculate the cost per worker.

undefinedA crew can be entered in more than one way. You can list as your resource Architectural Designers (for example) and if there are 2, your Maximum Units will be 200% (2 people working 40 hours per week). If they are paid at different rates, you can refer to each as Designer 1 with his/her rate and Designer 2 with his/her rate.

undefined

Resource Name Type Material Label Initials Group Max. Units Std. Rate Ovt. Rate Cost/Use Accrue At Base Calendar
Joe Work S 100% $25.00/hr $40.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard
Sim Work P 100% $45.00/hr $60.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard
Client Work C 20% $0.00/hr $0.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard
Lim Work S 100% $10.00/hr $20.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard
Leo Work P 100% $25.00/hr $45.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard
Tara Work E 100% $20.00/hr $35.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard
Kim Work E 100% $20.00/hr $35.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard
Conference Room Material E $0.00 $250.00 Start

undefined

You should Set Your Baseline (budgeted) cost, Save, and Insert a Baseline column. Then conduct an earned value analysis using a status date approximately one month from the schedule you determined after leveling resources. You can insert Earned Value columns into your Gantt View and/or use the Earned Value Report for your analysis.

undefinedActual costs can be entered if you turn off the Option (default) for Microsoft to automatically calculate costs. Then you can enter the Actual Costs. If you do not have actual costs, you can use the % Completed assuming that at the status date, you are on time. This needs to be explained in your report.

undefined

Part 7 – Conclusions

undefinedYou need to relate your project results to your scope statement, risk assessment, goals, objectives, etc. This is not a section for what you learned doing the project in this class. It wraps up your project by stating clearly what you observed. What changed from the beginning schedule? If you believe that the duration is now too long, what changes would you consider? Overall, what statements regarding this project would you give to management?

undefinedProject Deliverable:

undefined

Cover/Title Page
Table of Contents
  • Developing Your Project Plan
    • Background –Who? What? When? And How? of your Company
    • Current Process – What do they do overall and how? Large picture from start to end.
    • Overview of the Project – This should fit within the company’s current process. IFor example, if they build houses then your project is unique one. Start with what you need to deliver the building, assuming contract signed.
      • Objectives – measurable
      • General Approach- Technical and managerial
      • Constraints – what could prevent the project from being completed; time, money, gov’t regs, etc.
  • Developing the Work Breakdown Structure
    • Work Breakdown Outline (do not include the scheduling views)
    • Responsibility Matrix (explanation necessary for what it means to be notified, approve, etc.!)
  • Project Risk Assessment
  • Developing the Project Schedule
    • Project Schedule – shows beginning and end dates for each activity
    • Activity Precedence Diagram (Gantt)
    • Activity Duration Table
    • Milestones (you determine w/explanation)
    • Discussion of Critical Path w/ Visual Supporting Documentation (Network and/or tracking Gantt)
  • Managing your Project’s Resources
    • Resource Allocation – end result is who does what when
    • Resolved Resource Conflicts*
  • Developing the Cost Estimates & Budget
    • Budget Analysis
    • Time-Phased Budget – cash flow
    • Earned Value Analysis*
  • Conclusions – state what you have learned for this project; time, budget and quality aspects
*: All values selected must be explained; risks should be cited to sources if possible—Internet sites acceptable for this research)
*: explanation required
*: explanations required—basically this section seems out of place because sections V and VI must be done before this but do the latter then keep this as section IV)
Use Reports as necessary. EXPLAIN what you did and why! Don’t just provide camera shots w/o explanations!!!!

 

UNFORMATTED ATTACHMENT PREVIEW

Houston Oasis Project Management Description of Project Deliverables and Outline 1 Table of Content 1. Project Plan ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3 1.1 Company background …………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 1.2 Current process …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 1.3 Objective overview …………………………………………………………………………………………. 4 1.3.1 Objectives: ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4 1.3.2 General approach (Managerial): …………………………………………………………………. 5 1.3.3 General approach (Technical)…………………………………………………………………….. 5 1.3.4 Constraints ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 6 2. Work breakdown structure: Building a kitchen backyard …………………………………….. 7 2.1 Personnel table ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 7 2.2 Work breakdown structure ………………………………………………………………………………. 7 2.3 Responsibility Matrix: ……………………………………………………………………………………. 10 3. Risk Management Plan ……………………………………………………………………………………. 11 3.1 Risk assessment matrix ………………………………………………………………………………. 123 3.2 Risk contingency matrix ………………………………………………………………………………. 134 4. Developing the Project Schedule……………………………………………………………………… 17 4.1 Project tracker……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 16 4.2 Gantt Chart: Activity Precedence ……………………………………………………………………. 18 5. Managing Your Project’s Resources ………………………………………………………………… 21 6. Developing the Cost Estimates and Budget ……………………………………………………… 21 7. Conclusions …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 25 2 1. Project Plan 1.1 Company Background Houston Oasis, a company founded and located in Houston, is a construction organization specializing in construction of all sorts from renovating households to building multi-level structures. Houston Oasis has been successful in 99% of the projects it has obtained and continues to meet the highest level of customer satisfaction. It aims to create a new atmosphere that expresses peace and warmth in the homes of clients and a calm working environment for different company’s. With the work force of all the construction workers involved in each stage of the construction process, Houston Oasis has managed to increase its performance up to more than 50% of what it was, allowing it to speed past its competitors in the construction industry. This could be the cause of the company’s efficiency in time and delivery of customer expectations. 1.2 Current process a) Measure up usable, cleanable backyard space, and discuss designs with homeowner. b) Roughly plan the design and send these documents to the client. c) Apply any changes made by the client where possible and notify them of any possible risk. d) Create bid for client contract and run them through legal and technical departments. e) Ship bid to the client and follow up with customer, making sure to negotiate the bid acceptance. f) Build the design according to the plan and oversee budget, careful not to exceed the budget. 3 g) Present finished product to client, receive payment and close the project. 1.3 Project overview The project only consists of a kitchen built in the backyard of the homeowner. It will be equipped with a sink including hot and cold running water, brick counters and stone counter tops, storage drawers/storage cabinets, side burners, grill, refrigerator and a fire place all designed and arranged according to the clients wishes. The kitchen will also feature a cover made out of wood and roof tiles and furniture that is resistant to weather changes. The backyard kitchen does not feature appliances such as microwaves and dishwashers as they are more likely to get damaged by the outdoor atmosphere and can be found inside the house. 1.3.1 Objectives: Table 1: Objectives Goal Target Provide client with the plans and designs of ⚫ Excellent: 3 days the backyard kitchen ⚫ Fair: 5 days ⚫ Agreeable: 1 week ⚫ Excellent: -20% ⚫ Fair: -5% ⚫ Agreeable: -0% Reduce the amount of rework caused by ⚫ Excellent: -90% client inspection ⚫ Fair: -70% ⚫ Agreeable: -65% Reduce the amount of risks on the ⚫ Excellent: 100% construction sit ⚫ Fair: -80% Possible reduction in costs of raw materials 4 Decrease cost overruns ⚫ Agreeable: 65% ⚫ Excellent: -50% ⚫ Fair: 35% ⚫ Agreeable: 15% . 1.3.2 General approach (Managerial): Each stage of construction will be assigned a corresponding worker (Electrician, plumber, Painter, etc) and a Supervisor will be placed on site to oversee all of the stages of construction. These workers will ensure minimal waste of resources provided and they will be held accountable for the time at which these tasks are completed. Each corresponding worker will be assigned a number of laborers – depending on the workload – to aid in completing the delegated tasks within the given time frame in order to achieve the goal. A sign in and completion chart will be used to track and analyse the completed tasks. This will ensure the tasks are done on time. Corresponding workers are expected to record any wastage made. This will ensure efficiency and discipline in working with raw materials. A Safety manager will be placed onsite to ensure that all safety measures put in place – to avoid risks- are being followed. 1.3.3 General approach (Technical) Planning the project will require the use of blueprints, which will need computers. These will be supplied to the project designers (engineers). Financial advisors may be used to negotiate a good bid that would benefit both the company and client, and will assist in matters that may arise from overspending. During the lots clearing/demolition, haul-away vehicles will be provided to clear the area and prevent hoards of debris/waste. Resources (paints, plaster, cabinets, appliances, etc.) will be transported to and from the construction sit via load trucks which will be covered in the budget. 1.3.4 Constraints 5 1.3.4.1 Client constraints ⚫ Construction will strictly restrain backyard accessibility but should not close off the entire yard. ⚫ Inspections may prolong procedure, so schedule may be pushed forward. 1.3.4.2 Regulatory standards ⚫ Plumbing towards the backyard tabs may be polluted which could severely prolong the procedure. 6 2. Work breakdown structure: Building a kitchen backyard 2.1 Personnel Table Department Title Construction Department Mason Carpenter Labourer Electrician Plumber Supervisor Flooring installer/Tile setter Roofer Concrete finisher Painter Safety manager 2.2 Work Breakdown Structure WBS Task Description Backyard Kitchen 1.0 Prepare construction site 1.1 Clear surface 1.1.1 Lay Counter foundation 1.2 Dig holes for piping and electric wiring 1.2.1 7 Add piping and electrical wires 1.2.2 Add concrete 1.2.3 Lay Fire place foundation 1.3 Build Counter framing with brick 1.4 frame for grill 1.4.1 Frame for gas access door 1.4.2 Frame for plumbing access door 1.4.3 Frame for refrigerator 1.4.4 Frame for storage cabinets 1.4.5 Frame for electric outlets 1.4.6 Build Fire place Framing with brick 1.5 Build roof pillars 1.6 dig four holes for pillars 1.6.1 Place wood pillars in hole 1.6.2 Fill hole with cement 1.6.3 Build roof 1.7 Build roof frame 1.7.1 Place roof insulators 1.7.2 Place roof tiles 1.7.3 Build roof ceiling 1.8 Line inner roof with wood 1.8.1 Leave room for lighting 1.8.2 Place stone counter top 1.9 Cut space for sink 1.9.1 Cut space for grill 1.9.2 Cut space for side burners 1.93 Install 1.10 8 Sink 1.10.1 Grill 1.10.2 Refrigerator 1.10.3 Side Burners 1.10.4 lights 1.10.5 Fire place 1.10.6 Electric outlets 1.10.7 Plumbing access door 1.10.8 Gas 1.10.9 Gas access door 1.10.10 Metal storage cabinets 1.10.11 Test 1.11 Gas 1.11.1 Electricity 1.11.2 Water 1.11.3 Paint 1.12 Pillars 1.12.1 Ceiling 1.12.2 Install Flooring 1.13 Place weather resistant furniture 1.14 9 Prepare construction site Lay Counter foundation Lay Fire place foundation Build Counter framing with brick Build Fire place Framing with brick Build roof pillars Build roof 10 Painter Concrete finisher Flooring installer/ Tile setter Roofer Supervis or Plumber Electricia n Labourer Mason Deliverable Carpente r 2.3 Responsibility Matrix: Build roof ceiling Place stone counter tops Install Test Paint Install Flooring Place weather resistant furniture Key Responsible Accountable Consulted Informed Not involve d 11 *Note: ⚫ All workers marked as responsible are in charge or are the main persons allocated for that particular stage of construction or task. ⚫ All workers marked as accountable are required to be actively involved as that task or stage in construction has something to do with or contributes to their assigned tasks. ⚫ All workers marked as consulted are not required to give much impute but may give a suggestion or may provide some light guidance as the task in question contributes a smaller fraction to their allocated task. ⚫ All workers marked as informed are mainly supervisors, so they have to be notified of all of the stages of construction and how far along they are. ⚫ All workers marked as not involved have nothing to do with the task or stage of construction in question. 12 3. Risk Management Plan 3.1 Risk Assessment matrix Risk Likelihood Impact Detection When Difficulty Snake bites 27% 5 (work will stop 1 (bite mark immediately) can be seen In backyard and worker will be in pain) Hurricane 47% 5(work will stop 3 (Storm clouds On construction immediately) can be seen, site/road to an increase in construction sit wind, weather report) Gas leak Electrocution 50% 30% 5 (work will stop 5 (gas does not During gas immediately) have a colour) installation 3-5 ( depending 1 (Worker will During on severity of be in pain, electrical the burns there might be system inflicted) some burn installation marks) Pipe leakage 50% 3 ( will stop 2 (Can go While installing construction for unnoticed) or testing a little while 13 pipping system until problem is fixed) Serious injury 50% 5 (work must 1 (Wound is While working stop visible) with equipment immediately Key Likelihood Impact Detection difficulty % 1 (not 1(easy to much)- detect) – 5 (very 5 (hard much) to detect) 3.3 Contingency Matrix Risk Snake bites Response Transfer Trigger (what Contingency Who is is observed) plan responsible Two puncture Seek medical Site wounds and attention ( call supervisor/safety swelling around 911) manager Weather report Batten down Safety manager indicates your the site, move site is in direct equipment and path staff to safe wound Hurricane Mitigate location 14 Gas leak Mitigate Air smells of Remove all gas staff and Safety manager homeowners from the house and call 911 Electrocution Transfer Worker is Call 911, look unconscious, after worker Safety manager has burn Pipe leakage Repair Pipe is clearly Repair pipe leaking leakage and Supervisor test plumbing system again Serious injury Transfer Worker is Call 911, help gushing blood worker stop the out of their bleeding Supervisor wound *Note: Bellow are the sites used for the above tables Collier, E. (2017, October 18). Ten Common Construction Site Hazards. Hub from High speed training. Retrieved April 4, 2021, from https//www.highspeedtraining.co.uk/hub/common-construction-hazards/ Holley, P. (2020, August 21). Why One Expert Predicts Major Hurricane Hitting Houston Would Be “America’s Chernoby”. TexasMonthly. Retrieved April 4, 2021, from https://www.texasmonthly.com/news-politics/houston-hurricane-ship-channel-orourke/ O’Neil, M. E., Mack, K. A., Gilchrist, J., & Wozniak, E. J. (2007). Snakebite Injuries Treated in United States Emergency Departments, 2001-2004. Wilderness and Envirnmental Medicine, 7. PIIS1080603207702569.pdf 15 16 4. Developing the Project Schedule 4.1 Project Tracker Assigned to Progres s Start End Labourer 10% 4/4/21 4/7/21 Concrete finisher 17% 4/7/21 4/9/21 Concrete finisher 18% 4/7/21 4/9/21 Concrete finisher&Carpenter 25% 4/7/21 Mason 15% Mason 15% Roofer 25% Roofer 25% Mason 10% Task Building a backyard kitchen Prepare construction site Lay Counter foundation Lay Fire place foundation Build roof pillars Build Counter framing with brick Build Fire place Framing with brick Build roof Build roof ceiling Place stone counter tops Install Test Paint Install Flooring Place weather resistant furniture Labourer/Electrician/Plumb er Labourer/Electrician/Plumb er 55% 55% Painter 10% Flooring installer 50% Labourer 10% 17 4/13/2 1 4/13/2 1 4/14/2 1 4/16/2 1 4/16/2 1 4/19/2 1 4/19/2 1 4/19/2 1 4/20/2 1 4/21/2 1 4/10/2 1 4/14/2 1 4/14/2 1 4/16/2 1 4/16/2 1 4/16/2 1 4/19/2 1 4/19/2 1 4/19/2 1 4/20/2 1 4/21/2 1 4.2 Gantt Chart: Activity Precedence Apr 5, 2021 5 6 7 Apr 12, 2021 Apr 19, 2021 Tasks 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S Prepare construction site Lay Counter foundation Lay Fire place foundation Build roof pillars Build Counter framing with brick Build Fire place Framing with brick Build roof Build roof ceiling Place stone counter tops Install 18 Test Paint Install Flooring Place weather resistant furniture *Note: Critical path discussion Before any form of construction can take place, the site needs to be cleared (milestone) and dug up, if there are any trees or buildings in the area of construction, they must all be removed and cleared. The laying of the foundation (milestone) is also a critical stage in the construction process (if it is not done correctly, it might have to be removed and if it is removed it might not be as perfect as it is expected to be). The foundations of both the brick counter and the fireplace must be done at this stage along with the pillars of the roof top kitchen cover which have to be placed in the ground and reinforced by the concrete. Pipes and wire conduits have to be placed before the concrete is layered onto the ground. The next stage of construction consists of more of the building that will be done throughout the entire construction of the backyard kitchen. The brick fireplace and counter frames are built including the roof top and ceiling (milestone). The next section of the construction process involves mostly installations and finishes such as the installation of flooring, kitchen accessories (i.e. refrigerator, storage cabinets, grill, sink, stone countertop and etc) and painting all the surfaces that are meant to be painted such as the pillars of the roof and roof frame (milestone). The last stage applies the finishing touches to the kitchen which is placing the weather resistant furniture, completing the backyard kitchen (milestone). 19 20 5. Managing Your Project’s Resources 5.1 Resource Allocation Resource Name Task Allocated Reason Mason Build brick fireplace counter Work well with brick framing and stone countertop Carpenter Build roof pillars, measure Work well with wood and cut wood Labourer Does most of the heavy Extra man power duty jobs (lifting heavy equipment and materials) Electrician Plumber Electrical wire and wire Works well with wires and conduit, electricity circuit constructions Water, plumbing system Work well with low pressure systems (tap water, sewage) Flooring installer/Tile setter Installs concrete tiles Informed on how to install flooring properly and what type of materials brick,concrete) should (tile, be used Roofer Concrete finisher Builds roof top and ceiling, Has experience with building installs roof cladding roofs Concrete foundations Informed about the proper way to lay concrete 21 Painter Paints all wooden surfaces Informed about how to properly paint and finish different surfaces 22 Accrue-at Base Calendar $20.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard 25% $28.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard 80% $14.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard 50% $24.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard 50% $20.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard 100% $18.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard 50% $16.79/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard 50% $18.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard Std. Rate Cost/Use 75% Max. Units Type 6. Developing the Cost Estimates and Budget Mason Carpenter Labourer Electrician Plumber Supervisor Flooring installer/Tile setter Roofer 23 Concrete 40% $21.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard 10% $21.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard 50% $54.00/hr $0.00 Prorated Standard finisher Painter Safety manager Estimated budget $10 392 *Note The estimated budget for personnel was calculated using the Gantt Chart Activity Precedence (which shows all the days each worker/employee has worked) and the average hourly rate of each worker/employee. Each employee is assumed to be working for 8hrs on everyday they have been assigned to complete a stage in construction, so if an employee worked for three days, their total working hours would amount to 24hrs and they would then be paid accordingly. Keep in mind that the calculated wages are estimates, so the starting budget is prone to either decreasing or increasing depending on how long the employees work. 24 7. Conclusions It has been made evident that not everything in the project management plan can be done and completed to the last detail, most of the plan is prone to change as the planning and construction processes until completion.Blueprints for the designs would have to take more than three days considering the designs required and the changes made by the client, not to mention the measurements that have to be calculated and added to the blueprint. The danger/risk of running low on raw materials would cause the increase in product costs rather than reduction of costs, bringing any reductions to 0%. Risks on the construction site will undoubtedly stop or gravely delay any progression on the project. As a result, the overall duration of construction would be prolonged, which is contrary to the duration stated in this document. 25 Project Management Description of Project Deliverables and Outline: Outline 1. Project Plan 1.1 Company background 1.2 Current process 1.3 Objective overvie1 1.3.1 Objectives 1.3.2 General approach (Managerial): 1.3.3 General approach (Technical) 1.3.4 Constraints 2. Work breakdown structure: Building a kitchen backyard 2.1 Personnel table 2.2 Work breakdown structure 2.3 Responsibility Matrix 3. Risk Management Plan 3.1 Risk assessment matrix 3.2 Risk contingency matrix 4. Developing the Project Schedule 4.1 Project tracker 4.2 Gantt Chart: Activity Precedence 5. Managing Your Project’s Resources 6. De …
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