4. What does the current balanced portfolio look like?

I’m working on a management case study and need an explanation to help me study.

 

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Introduction: A key aspect of this course is to introduce you to real-life portfolio management case studies(in the file, about Food Packing Company). By now, from the Project Portfolio Management in Theory and Practice case study book, you should have picked a case study. This case study demonstrates how a company in an industry sector developed and implemented its project portfolio management model.

Deliverable: A Research Paper double spaced about 9 pages.

The first part of your paper will be a summary of the case study you selected from the resource no APA citation is required as you document what you observed about the case study.

You are likely to find external references or another case study associated with your research paper topic. Formal APA citation must be provided for all such observations in your paper. (Use the website https://www.citationmachine.net/apa

Some notes:

This is an individual assignment.

You have the opportunity to use any case study from the text book.

If you are employed, select a case from your industry sector, that is a recommendation but not required.

Present the key salient points of the industry as observed in the case study.

Each chapter has several cases. Selecting one sample company is fine. But you will benefit from reviewing more than one company.

No presentations are required.

Paper Structure

Executive Summary: Describe the industry, current portfolio, and how you are re-planning the portfolio of projects due to economic shock,

Overview of the Company: The first section of the case study should discuss the background of the organization, industry, or program. The introduction of your case study should introduce the business, industry, project, and portfolio that is represented in your study. It should state the proposed solution to the problem you have determined or state the general assessment of the case being studied. Describe the concepts of project value, portfolio balance, and strategic alignment. Discuss their approaches to enterprise-level resource planning for project portfolios. Talk about: Strategy, Scoring Model, Portfolio Balance, and Strategic Alignment. Try to tie your evaluation of the case to knowledge acquired in the course. What theory can you use as support to show that the case study is grounded in an effective PPP practice? Cross research — use any other external research material from http://www.projectmanagement.com or Google Scholar, Library to gain additional information that adds weight to your arguments.

Case Study Analysis: A case study analysis requires you to investigate a business problem, examine alternative solutions and propose the most effective solution using supportive evidence. In your case case consider:

Structure

Effectiveness of current portfolio

Solutions from the Current Case

Portfolio Redesign

Within the context of Portfolio Redesign consider the economic shock stemming from Covid-19 as a scenario — it will affect the industries differently and how they will need to change their focus and redesign their portfolio. Address how your scoring model and bubble chart changes. Note different companies might behave differently even though they are in the same industry sector. Feel free to make assumptions: example start up vs. established.

To conclude, a possible table of contents for the paper would look like:

1. Executive Summary

2. Overview – Describe the Industry and Company you selected.

3. Case Study Analysis: Portfolio Strategy of the selected case study. What scoring model is used? (Critical Success factors).

4. What does the current balanced portfolio look like?

5. Introduce economic shock scenario.(have to be the Covid-19 problem/situation)

6. Describe how the case study strategy and portfolio could be repositioned? What risks and opportunities do you see? Consider alternative solutions if possible. Provide recommended solution.

7. References: The required text book should be listed. Additionally at least two more references should listed.

Attachment:

Case study (food packing company)

SPM– my COURSE TEXTBOOK

 

UNFORMATTED ATTACHMENT PREVIEW

Project Portfolio Management in Theory and Practice 4 T EC P ( ‘ QA >= Q> E A 6J =PA EC P A A A Thirty Case Studies from around the World 8 Q P= =A 7 ( ‘ A P P E I=J=CAIAJP EJ P A T =J 5> 4AJP = 0= J E 1 EJ AJ PP . A> AJP = 4 A=PA I >Q J ( (‘ ) ‘ ,. ,.(- = PE A . ; E PT = A PQ EA I = QJ P A MQA P I <> =J A 1 PP . A> AJP = MQA P :QA P I P= CAP1 <> =J PT A1 Q . EJ Best Practices and Advances in Program Management Series Series Editor Ginger Levin RECENTLY PUBLISHED TITLES Project Portfolio Management in Theory and Practice: Thirty Case Studies from around the World Jamal Moustafaev Project Management in Extreme Situations: Lessons from Polar Expeditions, Military and Rescue Operations. and Wilderness Exploration Monique Aubry and Pascal Lievre The IT Geek’s Guide to Project Leadership Byron A. Love Situational Project Management: The Dynamics of Success and Failure Oliver F. Lehmann 4 T EC P ( ‘ QA >= Q> E A 6J =PA EC P A A A Ethics and Governance in Project Management: Small Sins Allowed and the Line of Impunity Eduardo Victor Lopez and Alicia Medina Becoming a Sustainable Organization: A Project and Portfolio Management Approach Kristina Kohl Improving Business Performance: A Project Portfolio Management Approach Ramani S Leading and Managing Innovation: What Every Executive Team Must Know about Project, Program, and Portfolio Management, Second Edition Russell D. Archibald and Shane Archibald Program Management in Defense and High Tech Environments Charles Christopher McCarthy The Self-Made Program Leader: Taking Charge in Matrix Organizations Steve Tkalcevich Transforming Business with Program Management: Integrating Strategy, People, Process, Technology, Structure, and Measurement Satish P. Subramanian Stakeholder Engagement: The Game Changer for Program Management Amy Baugh 8 Q P= =A 7 ( ‘ A P P E I=J=CAIAJP EJ P A T =J 5> 4AJP = 0= J E 1 EJ AJ PP . A> AJP = 4 A=PA I >Q J ( (‘ ) ‘ ,. ,.(- = PE A . ; E PT = A PQ EA I = QJ P A MQA P I <> =J A 1 PP . A> AJP = MQA P :QA P I P= CAP1 <> =J PT A1 Q . EJ THE STANDARD FOR PROGRAM MANAGEMENT Fourth Edition Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data has been applied for. ISBN: 978-1-62825-196-8 Published by: Project Management Institute, Inc. 14 Campus Boulevard Newtown Square, Pennsylvania 19073-3299 USA Phone: +610-356-4600 Fax: +610-356-4647 Email: customercare@pmi.org Internet: www.PMI.org ©2017 Project Management Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. Project Management Institute, Inc. content is copyright protected by U.S. intellectual property law that is recognized by most countries. To republish or reproduce PMI’s content, you must obtain our permission. Please go to http://www.pmi.org/permissions for details. To place a Trade Order or for pricing information, please contact Independent Publishers Group: Independent Publishers Group Order Department 814 North Franklin Street Chicago, IL 60610 USA Phone: +1 800-888-4741 Fax: +1 312- 337-5985 Email: orders@ipgbook.com (For orders only) For all other inquiries, please contact the PMI Book Service Center. PMI Book Service Center P.O. Box 932683, Atlanta, GA 31193-2683 USA Phone: 1-866-276-4764 (within the U.S. or Canada) or +1-770-280-4129 (globally) Fax: +1-770-280-4113 Email: info@bookorders.pmi.org Printed in the United States of America. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, manual, photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without prior written permission of the publisher. The paper used in this book complies with the Permanent Paper Standard issued by the National Information Standards Organization (Z39.48—1984). PMI, the PMI logo, PMBOK, OPM3, PMP, CAPM, PgMP, PfMP, PMI-RMP, PMI-SP, PMI-ACP, PMI-PBA, PROJECT MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, PM NETWORK, PMI TODAY, PULSE OF THE PROFESSION and the slogan MAKING PROJECT MANAGEMENT INDISPENSABLE FOR BUSINESS RESULTS. are all marks of Project Management Institute, Inc. For a comprehensive list of PMI trademarks, contact the PMI Legal Department. All other trademarks, service marks, trade names, trade dress, product names and logos appearing herein are the property of their respective owners. Any rights not expressly granted herein are reserved. 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 N OT IC E The Project Management Institute, Inc. (PMI) standards and guideline publications, of which the document contained herein is one, are developed through a voluntary consensus standards development process. This process brings together volunteers and/or seeks out the views of persons who have an interest in the topic covered by this publication. While PMI administers the process and establishes rules to promote fairness in the development of consensus, it does not write the document and it does not independently test, evaluate, or verify the accuracy or completeness of any information or the soundness of any judgments contained in its standards and guideline publications. PMI disclaims liability for any personal injury, property or other damages of any nature whatsoever, whether special, indirect, consequential or compensatory, directly or indirectly resulting from the publication, use of application, or reliance on this document. PMI disclaims and makes no guaranty or warranty, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of any information published herein, and disclaims and makes no warranty that the information in this document will fulfill any of your particular purposes or needs. PMI does not undertake to guarantee the performance of any individual manufacturer or seller’s products or services by virtue of this standard or guide. In publishing and making this document available, PMI is not undertaking to render professional or other services for or on behalf of any person or entity, nor is PMI undertaking to perform any duty owed by any person or entity to someone else. Anyone using this document should rely on his or her own independent judgment or, as appropriate, seek the advice of a competent professional in determining the exercise of reasonable care in any given circumstances. Information and other standards on the topic covered by this publication may be available from other sources, which the user may wish to consult for additional views or information not covered by this publication. PMI has no power, nor does it undertake to police or enforce compliance with the contents of this document. PMI does not certify, test, or inspect products, designs, or installations for safety or health purposes. Any certification or other statement of compliance with any health or safety-related information in this document shall not be attributable to PMI and is solely the responsibility of the certifier or maker of the statement. iii T ABLE O F CO NTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 1 1.1 Purpose of The Standard for Program Management ……………………………………………… 2 1.2 What Is a Program? ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 3 1.2.1 Initiation of Programs ……………………………………………………………………………… 6 1.2.2 The Relationships among Portfolios, Programs, and Projects ……………………… 7 1.3 What Is Program Management? ………………………………………………………………………….. 8 1.4 The Relationships among Portfolio, Program, and Project Management, and their Roles in Organizational Project Management (OPM) ……………………………… 10 1.4.1 The Interactions among Portfolio, Program, and Project Management ………. 12 1.4.2 The Relationship between Program Management and Portfolio Management …………………………………………………………………….. 12 1.4.3 The Relationship between Program Management and Project Management ……………………………………………………………………….. 12 1.5 The Relationships among Organizational Strategy, Program Management, and Operations Management …………………………………………………………………………….. 14 1.6 Business Value ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 15 1.7 Role of the Program Manager ……………………………………………………………………………. 16 1.7.1 Program Manager Competences …………………………………………………………….. 17 1.8 Role of the Program Sponsor …………………………………………………………………………….. 20 1.9 Role of the Program Management Office ……………………………………………………………. 20 v 2. PROGRAM MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE DOMAINS ……………………………………………………. 23 2.1 Program Management Performance Domain Definitions ……………………………………… 24 2.2 Program Management Performance Domain Interactions ……………………………………. 25 2.3 Organizational Strategy, Portfolio Management, and Program Management Linkage …………………………………………………………………… 26 2.4 Portfolio and Program Distinctions ……………………………………………………………………. 26 2.5 Program and Project Distinctions ………………………………………………………………………. 28 2.5.1 Uncertainty …………………………………………………………………………………………… 28 2.5.2 Managing Change …………………………………………………………………………………. 29 2.5.3 Complexity ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 31 3. PROGRAM STRATEGY ALIGNMENT ……………………………………………………………………………… 33 3.1 Program Business Case ……………………………………………………………………………………. 35 3.2 Program Charter ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 36 3.3 Program Roadmap……………………………………………………………………………………………. 36 3.4 Environmental Assessments ……………………………………………………………………………… 38 3.4.1 Enterprise Environmental Factors …………………………………………………………… 38 3.4.2 Environmental Analysis …………………………………………………………………………. 39 3.5 Program Risk Management Strategy………………………………………………………………….. 41 3.5.1 Risk Management for Strategy Alignment ……………………………………………….. 41 3.5.2 Program Risk Thresholds ………………………………………………………………………. 41 3.5.3 Initial Program Risk Assessment ……………………………………………………………. 42 3.5.4 Program Risk Response Strategy ……………………………………………………………. 42 4. PROGRAM BENEFITS MANAGEMENT …………………………………………………………………………… 43 4.1 Benefits Identification ………………………………………………………………………………………. 46 4.1.1 Benefits Register …………………………………………………………………………………… 47 4.2 Benefits Analysis and Planning …………………………………………………………………………. 48 4.2.1 Benefits Management Plan …………………………………………………………………….. 50 4.2.2 Benefits Management and the Program Roadmap ……………………………………. 50 4.2.3 Benefits Register Update ……………………………………………………………………….. 50 vi Table of Contents 4.3 Benefits Delivery………………………………………………………………………………………………. 51 4.3.1 Benefits and Program Components…………………………………………………………. 52 4.3.2 Benefits and Program Governance ………………………………………………………….. 52 4.4 Benefits Transition …………………………………………………………………………………………… 53 4.5 Benefits Sustainment ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 55 5. PROGRAM STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT …………………………………………………………………….. 57 5.1 Program Stakeholder Identification……………………………………………………………………. 60 5.2 Program Stakeholder Analysis ………………………………………………………………………….. 62 5.3 Program Stakeholder Engagement Planning ………………………………………………………. 63 5.4 Program Stakeholder Engagement …………………………………………………………………….. 64 5.5 Program Stakeholder Communications………………………………………………………………. 66 6. PROGRAM GOVERNANCE …………………………………………………………………………………………… 67 6.1 Program Governance Practices …………………………………………………………………………. 70 6.1.1 Program Governance Plan ……………………………………………………………………… 70 6.1.2 Program Governance and Vision and Goals ……………………………………………… 71 6.1.3 Program Approval, Endorsement, and Definition ……………………………………… 72 6.1.4 Program Success Criteria ………………………………………………………………………. 72 6.1.5 Program Monitoring, Reporting, and Controlling………………………………………. 72 6.1.6 Program Risk and Issue Governance ………………………………………………………. 73 6.1.7 Program Quality Governance ………………………………………………………………….. 74 6.1.8 Program Change Governance …………………………………………………………………. 74 6.1.9 Program Governance Reviews ………………………………………………………………… 75 6.1.10 Program Periodic Health Checks …………………………………………………………… 76 6.1.11 Program Component Initiation and Transition ………………………………………… 76 6.1.12 Program Closure………………………………………………………………………………….. 78 6.2 Program Governance Roles ……………………………………………………………………………….. 78 6.2.1 Program Sponsor ………………………………………………………………………………….. 80 6.2.2 Program Steering Committee …………………………………………………………………. 81 6.2.3 The Program Management Office ……………………………………………………………. 82 vii 6.2.4 Program Manager …………………………………………………………………………………. 83 6.2.5 Project Manager(s)………………………………………………………………………………… 84 6.2.6 Other Stakeholders ……………………………………………………………………………….. 85 6.3 Program Governance Design and Implementation ………………………………………………. 85 7. PROGRAM LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT ………………………………………………………………………… 89 7.1 The Program Life Cycle …………………………………………………………………………………….. 89 7.1.1 Program Life Cycle Phases Overview ………………………………………………………. 90 7.1.2 Program Definition Phase ………………………………………………………………………. 91 7.1.3 Program Delivery Phase…………………………………………………………………………. 95 7.1.4 Program Closure Phase …………………………………………………………………………. 97 7.2 Program Activities and Integration Management ………………………………………………… 98 7.2.1 Program Activities Overview ………………………………………………………………….. 98 7.2.2 Program Integration Management ………………………………………………………….. 99 7.2.3 Mapping of the Program Life Cycle to Program Activities ……………………….. 103 8. PROGRAM ACTIVITIES……………………………………………………………………………………………… 105 8.1 Program Definition Phase Activities …………………………………………………………………. 106 8.1.1 Program Formulation Activities …………………………………………………………….. 106 8.1.2 Program Planning Phase Activities ……………………………………………………….. 110 8.2 Program Delivery Phase Activities……………………………………………………………………. 124 8.2.1 Program Change Monitoring and Controlling …………………………………………. 125 8.2.2 Program Communications Management………………………………………………… 125 8.2.3 Program Financial Management …………………………………………………………… 127 8.2.4 Program Information Management ……………………………………………………….. 130 8.2.5 Program Procurement Management ……………………………………………………… 131 8.2.6 Program Quality Assurance and Control ………………………………………………… 132 8.2.7 Program Resource Management …………………………………………………………… 133 8.2.8 Program Risk Monitoring and Controlling………………………………………………. 134 8.2.9 Program Schedule Monitoring and Controlling……………………………………….. 136 8.2.10 Program Scope Monitoring and Controlling ………………………………………….. 137 viii Table of Contents 8.3 Program Closure Phase Activities ……………………………………………………………………. 138 8.3.1 Program Financial Closure …………………………………………………………………… 139 8.3.2 Program Information Archiving and Transition ………………………………………. 139 8.3.3 Program Procurement Closure ……………………………………………………………… 140 8.3.4 Program Resource Transition ……………………………………………………………….. 140 8.3.5 Program Risk Management Transition…………………………………………………… 140 REFERENCES ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 141 APPENDIX X1 FOURTH EDITION CHANGES …………………………………………………………………………………………. 143 APPENDIX X2 CONTRIBUTORS AND REVIEWERS FOR …
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