2. Provide a possible thesis: After you have coded your interview, provide a brief thesis that can be supported using interview quotes from your transcription. To help formulate a thesis, read over the codes you generated and create memoes to help organize and process all the codes. What consistent patterns do you see in your codes? What theories can you start to formulate?

I’m working on a sociology question and need an explanation to help me understand better.

 

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Drawing from the readings and lectures from this week, apply the knowledge about coding qualitative interviews and developing analytic themes to begin your data analysis section for HW#2:

1. Upload a transcribed AND coded interview: After you transcribe your interview, conduct open coding by reading line-by-line and highlighting passages that include themes, concepts, interesting points, etc. Immediately after that passage, add a label that identifies the code in parenthesis.

2. Provide a possible thesis: After you have coded your interview, provide a brief thesis that can be supported using interview quotes from your transcription. To help formulate a thesis, read over the codes you generated and create memoes to help organize and process all the codes. What consistent patterns do you see in your codes? What theories can you start to formulate?

 

SOC 302 HBS Coding Qualitative Interviews Discussion
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SOC 302 HBS Coding Qualitative Interviews Discussion
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SOC 302 HBS Coding Qualitative Interviews Discussion
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SOC 302 HBS Coding Qualitative Interviews Discussion
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SOC 302 HBS Coding Qualitative Interviews Discussion
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SOC 302 HBS Coding Qualitative Interviews Discussion
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UNFORMATTED ATTACHMENT PREVIEW

Soc 302: Sample Analysis of Qualitative Interview Transcript Analysis of a Qualitative Interview Quote Below is an example of how you should structure your interview analysis for Homework #2. You should include an analytic point/ topic sentence (highlighted in blue), some orienting information to set up your interview quote (green), the interview quote which should be indented and single-spaced (grey), and finally, you should provide an analytic commentary that clearly demonstrates how this quote supports your argument (pink). Collaboratively Building Communities through Social Media One of the ways Bronies build a sense of community is through the use of social media to foster a creative and social space for one another. In particular, platforms like Facebook and YouTube offer Bronies the opportunity to share their artwork, animation, fanfiction, and other displays of fandom. In the following interview excerpt, Tommy, an 18-year old high school student, explains how Bronies use YouTube to build a virtual platform for creativity: I think [the Brony community] has such a positive impact because you get an outlet and get to do something creative –a creative outlet. … You get to express yourself and have people read it, people look at your animations. People on YouTube that make animations, whoever looks at it, [are] like, “Oh! It’s just this other average guy, you know, making this animation whatever.” They might look at it once and then go away. But when you are a Brony and you make [an animation]—it can be super famous. Like this one animation video – I think it was a Vinyl Scratch with Octavia that had background characters on it—well it got several millions [of] views and it’s still growing — going up after all the time. That’s because Bronies want to see it. … This generates a lot of uplifting for the animators and for the fans. It’s a two-way street –you get to express yourself and make people happy — people get happy, and people lift themselves as well. Bronies like Tommy see virtual spaces like YouTube as a “creative outlet” to share their fan artwork with other members of the community. Fan artwork, including animations that replicate the TV show’s main characters, can be a way for Bronies to uniquely express themselves to other Bronies. Due to various virtual networks, animations created and shared by fellow Bronies have the opportunity to go viral and gain mass popularity. Unlike the “average guy” who might post an animation onto YouTube, Bronie artists have the potential to “make people happy,” especially other Bronies. By “uplifting” both the animators and fans, Bronies collectively build a supportive community through the virtual sharing of art. Soc 302: Sample Coded Interview Transcript Open Coding of a Qualitative Interview Transcript To demonstrate how to conduct open coding, I have included a few pages from an interview transcript from my qualitative study on a growing subculture called Bronies, or men who are big fans of My Little Pony. In this study, I was interested in examining what draws people into the TV show, My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, why people become Bronies, and what their experience has been like being part of the Brony community. I have included my codes by highlighting a passage in the transcript and then adding the code in parenthesis. Please code your notes in a similar way before you submit them on Discussion Board #8. BRONY INTERVIEW – Tommy INTERVIEWER: All right. Let’s get to the meats and potatoes of everything. Tommy, when did you first hear about My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic? Tommy: Oh! Man, it’s kind of long story (Not a simple path to learn about show). But it was one summer, I believe it was 2012 somewhere in that time and I had been looking through Facebook a whole lot and I started seeing these posts of ponies (role of social media) and I was wondering, “Why are they?” So these people posting, is it just because they are cute or something? (initially curious about posts from others) I wound up looking at it, looking at the reviews of it because I [was wondering] because my friends were posting it. I was so confused. (curiosity yet confused about interest) And then I’m looking at the reviews and immediately (checked reviews first before watching), when I was scrolling down it said musical and I’m like “No, I don’t think I want to watch that.” You know, because I can’t stand musical for the most part. I don’t know why, but yeah like Disney musicals or anything else – I can’t listen to it. (turned away because of musical aspect; association with Disney musicals) But later on, I had Netflix, so I could watch for, you know, younger cartoon stuff. And I saw My Little Pony pop up on the Netflix screen. (Suggested viewing on Netflix; role of advertisting?) I decided to watch it and I watched the first two episode, after the first two I wound up watching first season and then the second season I had caught up real Fast. I wound up watching the show the entire summer, sometimes I’d be staying up watching it and go two days just watching it. Just kind of like watch as much as I could. (binge watched; repeated viewings) And then later on, I guess I waited about maybe some month then I’m, like “Oh my god – I’m a Brony!” [Laughs] (self-label as Brony but only after a month later; identity must develop over time?) I had realized that I couldn’t just back off from it, you know, after I finished watching the two seasons, I was ready for more. I was like when does the third season come out, you know, it was crazy. (wanting to consume more; anticipating next season – part of Brony identity?) And well this is extra information should I provide that? INTERVIEWER: You can keep going if you like. Tommy: Okay. Well, I managed to actually convert one of my other friends– David and my other friend Travis. David– he has actually watched it and I managed to get him to watch it because he was like skeptical about it and my friend Travis (getting other people to watch show) –By the way, they both consented to having their name said — I asked them before the interview. (Talked to friends about interview and got permission to talk about them) So Travis, he watched it because he noticed that I was really into it. I even got like two other friends to dig it and a third person– I got him to watch it too and he is so into it now. Like how can a person be so anti pony or, you know? Being anti Brony then all of a sudden when they watch the first two episodes and then they just can’t stop, you know, changing their [social media] icon, getting pony merchandize everything.(starting as antiBrony and then becoming a fan) So yeah that’s how I got into the show and how I got others too. INTERVIEWER: And what were your first initial thoughts on the new generation 4 series? Tommy: Well, I was happy; I was excited the one major thing is after watching it all my depression went away (feeling happy; helped with his depression), like literally, it was crazy! INTERVIEWER: And how did your depression go away just from watching the show? Tommy: Well, before I was just very depressed and down– didn’t have friends, I didn’t really talk to anyone, [most] of the time, people don’t want to talk to me. And so because I was kind of antisocial, it just made me depressed because I could never relate to anyone. (depressed; no friends; antisocial) Then when I watched the show it’s like, I don’t know, it has a relatable quality to it — I feel like I could relate to the character, like every one of the characters is a trait that everyone as an individual has like the main six [ponies]. (can relate to show characters) But actually, I relate to Rarity the most and what she does, -like I believe the season four episode when she is with Tenderhoof and she likes him a lot. And the way she behaves, I don’t make giant… what’s it called? Those walls where you had the people on? Like I don’t do that, but he was just like infatuating, had so much passion to one thing and this one person. And that’s the kind of thing I do sometimes — if I really liked someone, I focus on one person and then put my all into that person. That’s how I feel reflected in Rarity actually. (connection with Rarity; displays feeling of passion the same way) INTERVIEWER: And why did you — why is it you feel such a strong connection to Rarity compared to the other five characters in the main six? Tommy: I believe that it’s because of her creative quality, she likes to make things and just try to help others as much as she can. And basically, I’m big into the generosity thing– I like to give hope and make sacrifices even if I don’t get anything in return. (pony characteristics – creativity and generosity; relates to generosity, hope, sacrifies) INTERVIEWER: Can you give me an example of what you mean by being into generosity? Tommy: Like I volunteered at the cafeteria helping to pick out the trash and I don’t –- I don’t know if I’m getting anything for it (volunteering at school). Sometimes they give me stuff during Christmas as a thank you, but I mean when they do, I still feel excited about it like “Oh! My god, you guys really care kind of thing!” You know, because whenever I do get something in return, it warms my heart to receive any act of kindness and generosity. You know, after you get something. But I don’t want the something– it makes me happy as well if they just smile or, you know. (reciprocal care; validation of generosity) INTERVIEWER: Why do you think that the Brony — the show and the Brony community, why do you think that the show has had such a positive impact on its viewers? Tommy: I think it’s because it’s like an outlet kind of. Because there are Brony fans out there that can be a little bit extreme, but that’s because we are a pack (extreme Bronies but still part of the pack?). But yeah, I think it has such a positive impact because you get an outlet and get to do something, do something creative –a creative outlet that’s what I’m trying to say. You get to express yourself and have people read it, people look at your animations. Like people on YouTube that make animations, whoever looks at it, is like, “Oh! It’s just this other average guy, you know, making this animation whatever.” They might look at it once and then go away. (creatively outlet for self-expression in community) But when you are a Brony and you make [an animation]—it can be like super famous. Like this one animation video – I think it was a Vinyl Scratch with Octavia that had background characters on it—well it got several millions views and it’s still growing — going up after all the time. (fan art shared with community; way to become famous) That’s because Bronies want to see it. That’s because, you know, they want see these background characters that’s how they would have interacted and this generates a lot of — this generates a lot of uplifting for the animators and for the fans. (generates bigger fandom with artwork) So it’s a two way street –you get to express yourself and make people happy, people get happy, and people lift themselves as well. (two-way street – you express yourself and make people happy, happiness of people makes you happy) INTERVIEWER: And do you think the animators actually listen to what the Brony community says? Tommy: Oh! Yes, I really–I have seen it actually. When I scroll down to the comments because I’m one of those guys that wants to scroll down and check and apparently a lot of Bronies do that as well. Also I see these responses from the actual YouTube person who was in YouTube that never happens. (use of social media; comment board to build community) Normally in YouTube, it’s arguing, yelling and fighting, cursing the person out. And [on Brony animations] you see “good job,” “that was amazing,” — positive uplifting words that normally don’t happen in the YouTube comments.(contrast to other YouTube comments – supportive comments; You might see pony fans like some guy– random guy — coming in, then all of sudden when someone types that in [negative comments] and decides to post it. Here comes the storm, you know, they kind of just get hit the same with that one because everyone gets outraged — like no, we were using positive kind of things. And then it starts, you know, going back and forth because the Bronies are very defensive of the people in our community and like to show people that we care. And people that receive it they, you know, they read it. (response to negative comments – “storm” of supporters; defensive and protective of community; displays of care) INTERVIEWER: You mentioned that fans can be a bit extreme. Can you tell me more about that? Tommy: – There’s always been that kind of, you know, the core fans, with the Little Cupcakes and Sweet Apple Massacre and all of those little fanfics that creep me out. But this is not my thing, I mean definitely go “Oh! All right fine.” I’m not into it but other people are into that kind of stuff. (stratification of different types of Bronies – core fans, extreme fans, fanfics; still accepting even though he’s creeped out)And those are the more controversial ones — lot of people are into that but again this is one of those things, you know, you are dealing with people or, you know, fans that are 14 to 30 and up and so that’s just one of the things that comes with it, you know? INTERVIEWER: Tommy, what does being a Brony mean to you? Tommy: Being a Brony means that I’m to love and tolerate and that I’m supposed to… I mean, I don’t know. I guess that’s mostly it — the main rule is to love and tolerate others which is something I already did. But I guess it just makes it more love and tolerate. (meaning behind Brony – love and tolerance) INTERVIEWER: And why is the main rule to love and tolerate? Tommy: I guess because most people judge by a book’s cover or just judge in general because they think just because someone looks a certain way or acts certain way, that, you know, that’s how they are. And I think that’s a very shaded way of thinking and that you should look deeper into who the person is — I guess that’s what the Bronies want to do — they want to show support. (non-judgemental; ways of showing support) INTERVIEWER: And why do they want to show support? Tommy: I honestly don’t know. I think it’s just the show’s influence.(power of show to build support) INTERVIEWER: Tommy, do you find the Brony community to be very open and accepting? Tommy: Yes, I do. Except for one thing, I think they don’t approve of the anti Bronies or haters. Like whenever they come into the comments, they [Inaudible 0:38:07] want to go somewhere, you know, start saying stuff. That’s the one thing that they kind of blow off on. Even though the love and tolerate thin — it’s like kind of thing that you only tolerate it so much. When you get to bullying others, it’s just, you don’t want to mess with us sometimes [Laughs]. (bullying in community; do not accept bulling behavior; “blow off on” as a response to bullying) INTERVIEWER: Why do you think people hate on the Brony community? Tommy: I think they hate on the community because they think that we’re “Man Children” and we shove the show down their throats. And that comment right there makes no sense whatsoever –you can’t shove something down the throat, without putting a TV or phone down your throat. We’re not smashing a pony down your throat either. But we’re like, “Why don’t you check it out? What would be good–you don’t even know.” And when they see it, it’s like, “Oh! It is good!” Because kind of like a food thing, I guess it would be more easy that way — like kind of good food that smells bad but it might taste awesome.(misconceptions about group; forcing subculture onto people; analogous to food) But yeah, I think that the haters, you know, don’t like the show and don’t like us because they just –it’s their prejudgment – they think that we are either gay, or man children or child molesters and we aren’t. (judgement from others outside the community; misconceptions; labeling INTERVIEWER: How about your friends, do they know that you identify as a Brony? Tommy: Oh! Yeah, yeah, my friends do. I think all of my actual friends– the only friends that do know –they are actually Bronies. (Friends vs actual friends; friends are other Bronies) INTERVIEWER: Okay. How important is it the fact that all of you guys identify as a Brony, how important is that to the friendship? Tommy: It’s kind of important but not really, it doesn’t really change the conversation so much. It just means that if we wanted, we could mention the latest Lyra episodes, I mean YouTube video or something like that. We could talk about it, but we still talk about other things like, I don’t know — relating to science field — that stuff I normally speak about. (ability to talk about show with friends; friendship does not revolve around show) INTERVIEWER: How about your classmates, do they know that you identify as a Brony? Tommy: Yeah, they do. INTERVIEWER: And how — what has their reaction been? Tommy: They are mostly some concerned and a little bit shocked, but they don’t really care. (rection from non-Bronies) I have a — this is slightly off topic but when I was in school I — well, I’m still in school but, you know. Well last year probably, I started a Brony club and so far it only has like about two people in it. This kind of sucks because I know there is more Bronies in the school. when I talk to some of them, they are like, “Well, I don’t want to do it, I don’t want to be picked on and judged and all that – whatever.” I guess they were kind of choosing to just not go there and to be afraid of being bullied even though they get support. (created club; closeted Bronies?) Anyway, the point is, after that fiasco, everyone at the school knew that I was Brony. They knew I was proud of it because I’m making posters and drawing and it looks really nice. Everybody was cool really — I think. And they don’t really mess with me about it because I’m medium build. I asked them a few times, “Would anyone mess with me?” and they said “No, no we don’t really mess with you about that.” [Laughs] Okay. So, yeah, I think they don’t really just mess with the buff Bronies because of the way I look. (openly out about being a Bronie; no bullying bc of his build; masculinity) And now — there was one kid, I mean, he wasn’t at my school, he was somewhere else. He was in the news report something, he was a Brony that got messed with. I think you heard about it. (bullying from outsiders of community) QUALITATIVE INTERVIEW CODING AND ANALYTIC THEMES (PART 1) Readings: – Babbie, Chapter 13 (pp. 408-416) – Sample Coded Interview Learning Objectives • Discuss grounded theory • Review the coding process of interviews • Open, axial, and selective coding • Highlight strategies for formulating analytic themes and subthemes • Memoing and Concept mapping • Examples of themes and subthemes • Discuss how to write analysis of interview data • Discussion Board #8 Grounded Theory • Inductive approach – no preconceived concepts or hypothesis • Deriving analytic theories directly from the data Coding Qualitative Data Coding – classifying or categorizing individual pieces of data • Helps organize data and find patterns Open coding • Reading interview line by line to identify ALL key concepts, ideas, themes, and patterns that emerge Axial coding • Identifies important core concepts by regrouping data Selective coding • Identifies central code of study Open Coding How to conduct open coding – See link posted on Titanium Additional considerations: • How do interviewees talk about, characterize, and unde …
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